Tesla is GO in Australia, Showroom Open, Cars delivered and Supercharger Network announced – EFTM

Tesla is GO in Australia, Showroom Open, Cars delivered and Supercharger Network announced

After months, or perhaps years of speculation, what for many was the dream of Tesla Motors opening in Australia is finally a reality.  Their Sydney showroom location has been...

After months, or perhaps years of speculation, what for many was the dream of Tesla Motors opening in Australia is finally a reality.  Their Sydney showroom location has been confirmed, their first cars delivered and the supercharger network announced.  EFTM has all the details.

IMG_4751

Confirming the details we broke some months ago, Artarmon will be the main showroom and service location for Telsa in Sydney.  This will also be one of two supercharger locations in Sydney.

Read our full review of the Tesla Model S

10678726_753764521382988_7908121112167490491_n

The showroom is big, in fact when compared to many US showrooms it’s enormous.  The front showroom area itself is as big as the Flagship San Jose store, however with the addition of delivery bays, offices, and service facilities, there’s also the need for a customer lounge so it all starts to add up, and look a like like any other car-dealer you might have visited – just a lot more fancy and with a lot less cars taking up space.

10858346_753764551382985_7427969010378983482_n

Just two cars are in the showroom, plus a “skateboard” chassis of a Tesla – this is an important feature of any Tesla showroom because the question of “where is the engine” is hard to explain this makes it a whole lot easier.

EFTM took a look inside the showroom today, ahead of it’s opening to the public tomorrow (December 10) – so if you want to see what all the fuss is about, check it out – on the corner of Herbert and Frederick St’s in Artarmon.

This evening at a gala event at The Star in Sydney, Tesla also delivered cars to their first customers in Australia.  Nine cars were delivered to some very happy customers.

Which begs the question, where are you going to charge it?

10690293_753764601382980_3846845172343884404_n

When you buy your Tesla, you are supplied with a home wall-charging unit.  The cost of installation is for the home-owner to cover, and while 40amp charging is “possible” – in reality most Aussie homes can’t handle that capacity, so slower charging will be the result.  That’s ok for daily drives and daily charges, but put some K’s on the clock and you’ve got some battery anxiety ahead of you.

10801594_753764628049644_3996083650953089593_n

If you’re like me and work near the Tesla showroom, no fear – they’ve added Superchargers to the forecourt.

These Superchargers will give you 50% charge in 20 mins, or a full charge in about an hour.  A second set of Superchargers will be permanently located at The Star in Sydney also.

Telsa’s plans are for a national supercharger network – but in reality if you’re outside of the eastern states, it’s a long, long wait.

Sydney, Melbourne and Brisbane will be covered by the end of 2016 – Tesla’s own Supercharger maps can finally be revealed:

In 2014:

1080-Australia-2014 (1)

By the end of 2015:

1080-Australia-2015 (1)

By the end of 2016:

1080-Australia-2016 (1)

Tesla are not releasing the actual locations of the Supercharger stations – however EFTM has taken a hard look at the Maps supplied, and having spent a lot of our lives on the roads between these cities, we’ve taken a stab at the locations.

We reckon given the desire to space them around 200km apart for range, and based on the maps, these are the most likely locations of the Superchargers when it’s all rolled out by 2016:

  • Gympie
  • Brisbane
  • Gold Coast
  • Grafton
  • Kempsey
  • Wallsend
  • Newcastle
  • Sydney (Artarmon)
    Sydney (Star)
  • Batemans Bay
  • Goulburn
  • Canberra
  • Holbrook
  • Albury/Wodonga
  • Seymour
  • Melbourne

Now remember, Tesla doesn’t need to build on-ramps and off-ramps to the freeways, they just need the space of around 5-8 parking bays at a fast food restaurant to make it work.  Of course in other places it helps them to build a spectacular looking “station” – only time will tell what each will be.

Stay tuned for our full review of the Tesla Model S later this week.

 

Categories
Motoring

Trevor produces two of the most popular technology podcasts in Australia, Your Tech Life and Two Blokes Talking Tech. He has a weekly radio show on 2UE, as well as appearances across the country and regularly provides Technology Commentary to Channel 9’s Today Show and A Current Affair. Father of three, he is often found down in his Man Cave. Like this post? Buy Trev a drink!
2 Comments on this post.
  • Core DITB
    10 December 2014 at 9:59 am
    Leave a Reply

    A Tesla Model S doesn’t need “40A for minimum” – you can charge it at lower rates, even from a standard wall socket. I have a Model S in Hong Kong and charge it often using a 13A BS1363 cable. Sure, it takes more than a day to charge, but it’s possible. With 40A charging, it takes much less time. Plug it in at night, even when it’s all empty, it will be full in the morning.

    Most of the time, though, I charge it at the supercharger stations. They are free for the life of the car, and charges the car to almost full, within an hour. Just like your mobile phone and laptop computer – if you insist on maximum charge, the last bit takes a bit longer.

    The rollout of the supercharger network will be critical, especially with the distances in Australia. A Tesla Model S can use about any charger, with the right cable or converter (ChaDeMo fast charging is until now only released in Japan, but will arrive to other markets later on).

    Congrats, Australia, on the launch of the Model S – enjoy!

    • Trevor Long
      10 December 2014 at 7:48 pm
      Leave a Reply

      Hi nameless person, you’re spot on – however, as I state above “and while 40amp charging is “possible” – in reality most Aussie homes can’t handle that capacity, so slower charging will be the result” – nowhere do I say “need 40A for minimum” – so I’m not understanding what you are getting at.

      A standard “wall socket” cable might be in development, but it’s not available, and this IS a barrier to entry for the average consumer – fanbois aside, there’s a long road ahead for Tesla, but we reckon it’s a winner.

    Leave a Reply

    *

    *